Speaker Bios

Wednesday September 9

10:30 am – 12:00pm EDT Abolition or death: Confronting police forces in Canada

Desmond Cole is a journalist, activist, and author. He has spent the last ten years reporting and commentating on politics and social justice. He is especially interested in the struggle for Black liberation within Canada. Desmond’s work includes ten years of local and national news coverage, five years of radio broadcasting at Newstalk 1010, a disruptive opinion column with the Toronto Star and an award-winning feature for Toronto Life magazine. Desmond’s first book, “The Skin We’re In: A Year of Black Resistance and Power”, is currently the #1 bestselling non-fiction book in Canada

Beverly Bain is a Black queer feminist scholar –activist and teaches in Women and Gender Studies in the Department of Historical Studies at the University of Toronto Mississauga. She currently teaches and researches in the area of The Black Queer Feminist Radical Tradition, Black and Caribbean diasporic sexualities, Gender, Feminism and Post Colonial Theories and Gender, Violence and Resistance.  Bain is the author of  “Fire, Passion and Politics: The Creation of Blockorama as Black Queer Diasporic Space in the Toronto Pride Festivities.” In We Still Demand: Defining Resistance in Sex ad Gender Struggles. Edited by Patrizia Gentile, Gary Kinsman and L Pauline Rankin. UBC Press, 2017; “Wake Work and The Coronavirus”. Tilting 2, The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. May 2020, Blackwood Gallery as well as several other articles. Bain is currently working on a series of essays on Black radical feminist queer activism in Toronto from the 80’s to the present. 

12:30 pm- 2pm Solemn Promises on Stolen Land: Policing and Treaty-Breaking on 1492 Land Back Lane

Professor Emeritus Eileen Antone is a member of the Oneida of the Thames First Nation, Turtle Clan. A former Director of Aboriginal Studies and the Centre for Aboriginal Initiatives at the University of Toronto, Prof. Antone is a member of the Elders’ Circle at U of T and is currently the Special Advisor to the Dean on Indigenous Issues at the Faculty of Arts & Science. Prof. Antone’s research, teaching, and professional writing has focused on Indigenous knowledge, literacy, and language, the Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address, and the significance of community-engaged learning.

Susan M. Hill is a Haudenosaunee citizen from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory. She is an Associate Professor of History and the Director of the Centre for Indigenous Studies at the University of Toronto. Her areas of research include Haudenosaunee history, Indigenous research methodologies and ethics, and Indigenous territoriality. She is the author of The Clay We Are Made Of: Haudenosaunee land tenure on the Grand River (University of Manitoba Press, 2017). She is the 2020-21 President of the Native American & Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA). 

Courtney Skye is a Haudenosaunee citizen from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory and a Research Fellow at the Yellowhead Institute. She has led policy development for the public sector at local, provincial, and national levels. This includes a framework for youth development, a strategy co-developed with Indigenous partners to transform the governance, design, and delivery of child and family services, and a strategy to end violence against Indigenous women. Courtney strives to end all forms of colonial violence experienced by Indigenous peoples.

Kevin White is a Mohawk from Akwesasne, with family from the Tonawanda Band of Seneca. He is an Assistant Professor in the Department for the Study of Religion and Centre for Indigenous Studies at the University of Toronto. Kevin started at the University of Toronto in 2019. He was a Fulbright Fellow at Brock University, where he worked with the Indigenous Knowledge Centre at Six Nations Polytechnic. Previously, he was faculty and the Director of the Native American Studies and American Studies Programs at SUNY Oswego. His research focuses on the Haudenosaunee Creation narratives and storytelling as a way of better understanding cultural knowledge and history of those who have long called Turtle Island home for generations upon generations. Kevin aspires to help students and others face squarely the complicated pasts we all share. You can read more about him here.

2:30-4pm Gender, Colonialism and Anti-Black Police Racist Violence

OmiSoore Dryden is the James R. Johnston Chair in Black Canadian Studies in Dalhousie University’s Faculty of Medicine, an Associate Professor in the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology and an interdisciplinary scholarship and researcher who focuses on Black LGBTQ folks, blood donation, health equity and well-being. 

El Jones is a poet, educator, journalist and advocate. She was the fifth Poet Laureate of Halifax, and the 15th Nancy’s Chair in Women’s Studies at Mount Saint Vincent University. El is a 2016 recipient of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission Burnley “Rocky” Jones award. El is a co-founder of the Black Power Hour, a radio show developed collectively with prisoners. Her advocacy and work fights anti-Black racism in Canada, walking in the path of our great-grandmothers who resisted relentlessly. Her book of poetry and essays on state violence, Canada is So Polite will be released in the winter from Gaspereau Press.

Erica Violet Lee is a Writer and community organizer from Saskatoon

4:30pm – 6pm EST Scholars and Educators for Black Lives

Sandy Hudson is a Toronto-based organizer, communications specialist, political strategist, public intellectual, writer and abolition activist.

Moderator:
Janelle Brady is a  PhD candidate in OISE’s Social Justice Education department at OISE.

7pm – 8:30 PM EDT Migrant Workers in Canada: Unfree Labour on Stolen Land

Min Sook Lee is an Associate Professor at OCAD University in the Faculty of Art, Art & Social Change. Lee’s latest documentary Migrant Dreams tells the story of migrant worker resistance in Canada.

Chris Ramsaroop is Course Instructor in Caribbean Studies, New College University of Toronto and Sessional Instructor University of Windsor Faculty of Law Migrant Workers Clinic. Chris is a PhD candidate at the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education at the University of Toronto and an organizer with Justice for Migrant Workers.

Adrian Smith is an Associate Professor at the Osgoode Hall Law School faculty.  He is co-editor of Unfree Labour? Struggles of Migrant and Immigrant Workers in Canada (PM Press, with Professor Aziz Choudry).

Evelyn Encalada Grez is a transnational labour scholar, organizer and co-founder of Justice for Migrant Workers and Assistant Professor in Labour Studies at Simon Fraser University.

Thursday September 10, 2020

9:30 – 10:15am Legacy of Policing Indigenous Lands and Bodies in Canada 

Dr. Pamela D. Palmater is a Mi’kmaw citizen and member of the Eel River Bar First Nation in northern New Brunswick. She has been a practicing lawyer for 20 years and is currently an Associate Professor and the Chair in Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University. 

11am- 11:30am Indigenous Responses to Black Resistance

Dr. Bonita Lawrence is a Professor in the Department of Humanities at York University, where she is a founding member of the Indigenous Studies program where she teaches. In addition to her recent novel N’in D’La Owey Innklan: Mi’kmaq Sojourns in England, Dr. Lawrence has authored two academic books:  Fractured Homeland: Federal Recognition and Algonquin Identity in Ontario and “Real” Indians and Others: Mixed-Race Urban Native People and Indigenous Nationhood as well as co-authoring, with Kim Anderson, a collection of essays entitled Strong Women Stories: Native Vision and Community Survival.  She has been teaching in the area of Indigenous-Black relations across the Americas for the past decade.

12pm -1:30 PM EST Black Tax and the Invisible Labour of Black Women in the Academy

Dr. Andrea A. Davis is Associate Professor in Black Cultures of the Americas in the Department of Humanities and Special Advisor on LA&PS’s Ant-Black Racism Strategy at York University. She is former Chair of the Department of Humanities and holds cross-appointments in the graduate programs in English; Interdisciplinary Studies; and Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies. Her research focuses on the literary productions of Black women in the Americas. She is particularly interested in the intersections of the literatures of the Caribbean, the United States and Canada and her work encourages an intertextual cross-cultural dialogue about Black women’s experiences in diaspora.

Michele A. Johnson is a Professor in the Department of History and Associate Dean Students in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies at York University. She has served as the coordinator of the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Programme, York’s Affirmative Action Officer and as the Director of the Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on Africa and its Diasporas. Johnson previously taught in the Department of History at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica and currently teaches courses which focus on “Blacks in the Americas.” Her publications and research interests focus on Jamaican cultural history in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as well as on gender relations, race/racialization, labour, domestic slavery and domestic service in Jamaica and Canada.

2pm – 3pm EST Co-Conspiring Against Carceral Systems

Eve Tuck is an Associate Professor in the department of Social Justice Education, and Canada Research Chair of Indigenous Methodologies with Youth and Communities at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. Her recent books include Toward What Justice? (Co-Edited with K. Wayne Yang), Who Decides Who Becomes a Teacher? (Co-Edited with Julie Gorlewski), and Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education (Co-Edited with Linda Tuhiwai Smith and K. Wayne Yang). Tuck is Unangax and is a member of the Aleut Community of St. Paul Island, Alaska, and grew up in Pennsylvania. 

Megan Scribe (Ininiw iskwew, Norway House Cree Nation) is an interdisciplinary Indigenous feminist researcher, writer, and educator. Scribe is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Ryerson University. Her dissertation, Indigenous Girlhood: Narratives of Colonial Care in Law and Literature, establishes connections between violence against Indigenous girls, storytelling, and settler colonialism. Her most recent co-authored publication (with Sefanit Habtom), To Breathe Together: Co-Conspirators for Decolonial Futures, contemplates how Indigenous, Black, and Black-Indigenous peoples can conspire against settler colonialism and anti-Blackness as part of shared worlding projects. She is the co-author (with Stephanie Latty, Alena Peters, and Anthony Morgan) of Not Enough Human: At the Scenes of Indigenous and Black Dispossession draws upon Indigenous feminist and Black feminist theory to examine interlocking systems of oppression that ultimately uphold white settler societies to the detriment of Indigenous, Black, and racialized life in Canada and the United States. Scribe is a long-time volunteer with the No More Silence’s Strawberry Ceremony and Aboriginal Legal Services’ Diversion Program. 

3:30pm – 5pm EST Two Crises: A Virus and Labour

Rinaldo Walcott is a professor in the Women and Gender Studies Institute at University of Toronto. He is co-author with Idil Abdillahi of Blacklife: Post-BLM and the Struggle for Freedom (ARP Books) and the forthcoming The Long Emancipation: Moving Towards Black Freedom (Duke University Press).

5:30pm – 7pm EST Race to Incarcerate in the University. 

Beverly Bain is a Black queer feminist scholar –activist and teaches in Women and Gender Studies in the Department of Historical Studies at the University of Toronto Mississauga. She currently teaches and researches in the area of The Black Queer Feminist Radical Tradition, Black and Caribbean diasporic sexualities, Gender, Feminism and Post Colonial Theories and Gender, Violence and Resistance.  Bain is the author of  “Fire, Passion and Politics: The Creation of Blockorama as Black Queer Diasporic Space in the Toronto Pride Festivities.” In We Still Demand: Defining Resistance in Sex ad Gender Struggles. Edited by Patrizia Gentile, Gary Kinsman and L Pauline Rankin. UBC Press, 2017; “Wake Work and The Coronavirus”. Tilting 2, The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. May 2020, Blackwood Gallery as well as several other articles. Bain is currently working on a series of essays on Black radical feminist queer activism in Toronto from the 80’s to the present. 

Idil Adillahi is an Assistant professor in the School of Disability Studies at Ryerson University.  She is the co-author with Rinaldo Walcott of the book Black Life: Post BLM and The Struggle For Freedom.

rosalind hampton is an educator and activist from Montreal who works as a professor of Black Studies in the Department of Social Justice Education at the University of Toronto.

ReplyForward
%d bloggers like this: